Dell Technology's Magazine

New work for Dell and their executive journal, Realize. We commissioned Noah Berger to document work being by @draperlab, @chicostate, and @calfire to use satellite imagery and data to help predict wildfire behavior.

We also got to use some of Noah’s excellent work from the #paradisefire. @noah3929 .

I also commissioned Bob O’Connor to photograph Dell Technologies CTO John Roese.

IMG_1152.jpg

Conference Promo Video for NCREIF

I had the pleasure of traveling to Orlando recently to produce a series of videos for NCREIF. NCREIF — the leading provider of investment performance indices and transparent data for US commercial properties — was ready to increase visibility around the benefits of membership and their hallmark conferences.

Together with CDB Productions, we interviewed 20 individuals over two days, captured the energy of their conference, as well as highlighted the many educational opportunities available to their members.



Website Edit for Matt Rainwaters

xhbtr_a758fb72-3387-4ab9-b4e6-8323c6631e7f_w1200.jpg

I wanted to share a new website portfolio edit I just wrapped up with Matt Rainwaters. This was a really fun project because Matt was looking to weave together bodies of work with different styles and themes. He wanted a free-flowing edit and I think we landed on something pretty beautiful.

It’s a bit stream of consciousness. You get to meander through bodies of work, interspersed with textures and unrelated moments. I’m very happy with it and hope you’ll check it out here.

Editorial Workshop

image.png

I'm so excited to be teaching this editorial workshop, along with the amazing Leslie Baldwin!

This is an updated version of a popular workshop I taught in Dallas, and will be a great experience for any photographer (aspiring or professional) who is looking to deepen their approach to destination and travel storytelling.

You’ll shoot and edit for two days in a welcoming, constructive group environment. We'll be taking full advantage of many of the wonderful things Austin has to offer, with a shot list comprised of restaurants, shops, and activities around town.

REGISTRATION IS OPEN --> http://www.ilovetexasphoto.com/shop/editorial-workshop/

-----------------------------------------

You will leave this class with:

✅ First-hand knowledge of what an editorial photo editor is looking for in feature story photography

✅ Strategies for handling a feature story assignment, from logistics to building a rapport with subjects

✅ A concise edit of new images that you can add to your own portfolio, build a promo out of or share on your social media accounts

✅ Real-world examples of marketing efforts that get the attention of magazine editors and art buyers

✅ An annual marketing checklist, with suggestions for when to do social, email and print promotions

-----------------------------------------

Class size is limited to 12 to ensure maximum awesomeness and opportunities for high fives!

Diversity in Photography - Resources

Originally published September 2016. Updated March 2019.

As discussions around representation, diversity, and equality in media and journalism (have finally!) become more frequent, new resources are becoming available to help creatives find, hire and publish photography by women and people of color.

This list features organizations dedicated to increasing the presence of underrepresented groups in the media. Please contact me if you have corrections or suggestions for additional links.

Creative Directories & Agencies

Women Who Draw
Illustration is not my main area of focus, but as a photo editor, I am sometimes asked to make illustrator recommendations. I love this database for the filtering capabilities (location, race, illustration style, etc).

Women Photograph
Excellent resource for finding female-identifying and non-binary photographers around the world. Founded by Daniella Zalcman.

GirlGaze
”Girlgaze, initially created as an Instagram hashtag highlighting the female perspective, is an online jobs marketplace and creative agency that connects companies and brands with a global community of diverse and inclusive female-identifying creatives to generate award winning content.”

Women in Photography
Women in Photography is a platform for any female Photographer or photo interest. The aim is to give female artists a platform to show their work, inspire and encourage on their journey as a photographer.

Rueda Photos
A collective focusing on “themes with social context, referring to the territory, the gender issues and the current affairs that are specific to it”.

F Collective
”An initiative that asks brands + their agencies to pledge to present a female photographer option on each job, with a goal of increasing gender diversity in advertising photography.”

Free the Bid
FREE THE BID is a 501c3 non-profit initiative advocating on behalf of women directors for equal opportunities to bid on commercial jobs in the global advertising industry.

We, Women
”Through a radical transformation of image-making—with the goal of contributing to lasting change—We, Women believes we can revolutionize how we see our world and ultimately, ourselves.” Offers grants and other opportunities.

Authority Collective
”The Authority Collective is a group of womxn, femmes, trans, non-binary and gender non-conforming people of color reclaiming their authority in the photography, film and VR/AR industries.”

Diversify Photo
Another fantastic database of artists around the world. “Diversify was born out of a recognition that calling for more diversity in the photo industry is not enough. To diversify photo, we need to equip Art Buyers, Creative Directors, and Photo Directors with resources to discover photographers of color available for assignments and commissions.”

Natives Photograph
”Natives Photograph is a space to elevate the work of Indigenous visual journalists and bring balance to the way we tell stories about Indigenous people and spaces. Our mission is to support the media industry in hiring more Indigenous photographers to tell the stories of their communities and to reflect on how we tell these stories. “

Native
”We connect emerging journalists, documentary makers and visual storytellers from underrepresented regions and communities with major publications and introduce them to a global audience."

Majority World
Massive list of photographers from Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East. Hard to search by destination, suggest contacting with specific needs. “We specialise in sourcing high quality images from these diverse continents, which provide unique insights into local cultures, environments and development issues.”

African Photojournalism Database
African Photojournalism Database is a directory of emerging and professional African news photographers, photojournalists and documentary photographers reporting on cultural, economic, environmental, political and social issues on the continent, as well as sports, nature, and stories of everyday life. There are over 400 photographers currently listed on the database, including over 180 professional photographers. 

Stock photo archives

Getty’s Lean In collection
Jointly curated by Getty Images and LeanIn.Org – the women’s empowerment nonprofit founded by Sheryl Sandberg – the collection features over 6,000 images of female leadership and equal partnership in contemporary work and life.

CreateHER Stock
”A grassroots resource and digital space for stock imagery that can be used for lifestyle, business, and everyday content creation for bloggers, creatives, and online influencers.”

Refinery 29's 67% Project, creating body-positive imagery of women of all sizes: Images available through Getty

Broadly
”The Gender Spectrum Collection is a stock photo library featuring images of trans and non-binary models that go beyond the clichés. This collection aims to help media better represent members of these communities as people not necessarily defined by their gender identities—people with careers, relationships, talents, passions, and home lives.”

TONL
“Culturally diverse stock photos that represent the true world we live in. Creating an inclusive culture takes both commitment and action. A diverse mix of voices leads to better discussions for everyone.” Founded by Joshua Kissi.

Blend
Recently rebranded to Tetra Images. Blend used to be a decent source of more diverse stock photography options. I’ve not used Tetra and am not sure if they have maintained that area of focus.

Offset
Not specifically a stock archive showcasing the work of underrepresented communities, however, they do make an effort to feature more diverse and representational photography.

Misc

3% Movement

Personal Project Edit for Elijah Hurwitz

Screen Shot 2019-02-17 at 10.59.53 PM.png

For photographer Elijah Hurwitz, we worked together to edit two of his personal projects so that he could pitch them to various publications. They went on to be published in National Geographic and Vice.

The first story, for National Geographic, is a collection of broad visual reportage from the NK border in China focused on daily life and trade in the wake of UN sanctions and nuclear tensions. You can read more about that article here, and see Elijah’s album on the topic here.

The second story, published in Vice, is a deep dive into a surprising and passionate community of swimmers in unlikely waters: the river between North Korea and China. You can read more on the Vice website here, and see more from Elijah’s series here.


elijah-hurwitz-natgeo.gif

Magazine-style Promo for Eric Pohl

190111_0674.jpg

Recently, Eric Pohl and I worked together to create a promo of his work. Eric’s photography primarily focuses on Texas culture, food and places. He also covers travel, landscapes, scenic backroads and the nostalgic and historic side of small towns. His photography has been featured in publications like Austin Monthly, Texas Highways, Texas Parks & Wildlife, and The Local Palate.

More of Eric’s work can be seen here.

John Michael Fulton Website Update

Last year I had the opportunity to work with John Michael Fulton. Together we created a brand new website that highlights his fashion, lifestyle and portrait photography.

JM works with editorial and commercial clients like 7 For All Mankind, Nylon Magazine, Mod Cloth, Rachel Zoe and many more.

I’m looking forward to following his work and seeing future projects. See more of his work at www.johnmichaelfulton.com.

Photo Editor for Texas Book Festival

event-share_image-8187055.jpg

Last fall, I had the pleasure of being an on-site photo editor for the Texas Book Festival. The photography team, led by Bob Daemmrich, included Deborah Cannon, Laura Skelding and Marjorie Kamys Cotera.

Lots of great photography events including talks and book signings with Pete Souza, Kenny Braun, Wyatt McSpadden, Pete Beste, Jay B Sauceda, and Casey Dunn.

Highlights from the 2018 Texas Book Festival can be viewed here. Check out some of my favorite photos below!

Screen Shot 2019-02-03 at 9.11.37 PM.png

Susie Mann Website Update

Screen Shot 2019-01-27 at 10.55.22 PM.png

I’m so happy to share the website I created with NYC-based lifestyle and portrait photographer Susie Mann (@susiemcreative). Susie brings a fabulous energy to her work, creating images where people exude confidence and joy.

Susie came to me looking to freshen up her portfolio and marketing.

Here’s what we did together:

✅ Talked about her goals, what inspires her, and what kind of work she enjoys doing the most.

✅ Updated her website with a totally new edit

✅ Fine-tuned her @aphotofolio website template (love the new look!)

✅ Marketed her website update with an email blast to relevant clients

These are a few of my favorite photos from her site. Check out the full galleries here.

Website Refresh For NashCo

Screen Shot 2019-01-27 at 10.31.22 PM.png

I’m so happy to share the updated website I edited for Portland, Oregon based @nashcophoto. I love their tagline, “We make real people look cool”!

From celebrities and students to doctors and farmers, they capture people in an effortless way.

Their portraiture is beautifully complimented by their storytelling.

You can see more of NashCo’s work here.

Texas Tribune Festival Photo Editor

Screen Shot 2019-01-21 at 1.32.14 PM.png

This fall, I had the pleasure of working with the media team for one of my favorite events, the Texas Tribune Festival. Working this event is a fun whirlwind of scheduling, editing, captioning, funneling images to social media teams, and of course, breakfast tacos and coffee. Lots, and lots of coffee.

Austin is lucky to have some incredibly talented, hard-working photojournalists covering this event. The Tribune Festival photography team included Bob Daemmrich, Callie Richmond, Chris Carrasquillo, Erich Schlegel, Erika Rich, Marjorie Kamys Cotera, Rachel Zein, Rudolfo Gonzalez, Stephen Spillman, Steve Moakley, Thomas Meredith and fellow photo editor Leslie Baldwin.

Thanks to Tribune Creative Director Jacob Villanueva for putting together a rock-star team! If you are in need of solid event or editorial coverage, these photographers should be on your list!!

If you're in need of an editor to produce photo and video coverage, give me a shout!

You can see more photos from the event here, and read more about the Texas Tribune Festival here.

Portfolio Review Dos and Don'ts

Photos by George Long http://GeorgeLong.com, used with permission.

Photos by George Long http://GeorgeLong.com, used with permission.

(Originally published in 2014, updated January 2019) I just returned from 4 days of photo-related festivities in NYC. The mothership of the week is the PhotoPlus Expo at the Javits convention center, with other events happening around the same time to capitalize on having so many photographers in town at once. Every night there are parties and book signing and openings.

Aside from all seeing old friends and meeting new creatives and photographers, I spent most of my time during the day doing portfolio reviews at the PDN/Palm Springs Portfolio Review. This was probably my 15th organized review event and I thought it'd be helpful to give some guidance on how to get the most out of one.

I also reached out on twitter and facebook for creatives' pet peeves. Below are some of the most popular answers.

DO

Be honest with yourself about if you are really ready to show the work. Maybe you need another year of shooting before you start showing your book to art buyers, art directors and photo editors. You only get one chance at a first impression, don't rush it if it's not the right time. Ask people who you trust for their honest opinion.

Research your reviewers and make sure that your work is relevant to what they do. You have 15-20 minutes, often with some pretty influential and powerful creatives in the industry, don't waste it. Would you roll up to a job interview without knowing anything about the company?

Have a purpose for each review and communicate that purpose to the reviewer when you sit down. Example: "I've been following your magazine for years and feel my work would fit in. Do you think I'm ready to shoot for you, and if not, what needs improvement?"  Or, "I would love get feedback on the book and recommendations for colleagues in the industry who may respond to my style of work." Or, "This is a new personal project that I'm working on, would love to know if you think it's ready to show to galleries."

Come armed with 1 or 2 specific questions that are pertinent to your reviewer's area of expertise.

Do bring the actual portfolio that you intend to show to clients. Hopefully the reviewers you meet with are also potential clients. They're not going to give you a pass because you intend, later on, to make a better book. So don't bring a hastily thrown together book and then say that you are going to change it later. The whole point of the portfolio review is to get feedback and how can someone give you good feedback if what they are looking at isn't what you really want to show?

New Orleans Photo Alliance's PhotoNOLA portfolio review session at the International House Hotel conference facility. Photo by George Long, used with permission.

New Orleans Photo Alliance's PhotoNOLA portfolio review session at the International House Hotel conference facility. Photo by George Long, used with permission.

Make sure your prints look great. This is especially important when seeing galleries.

Leave behind a well-printed leave behind. Invest in a graphic designer to help you create something that looks professional. Just because you know Photoshop doesn't mean you are a designer. If you are seeing a dream client, kick it up a notch and leave something more unique than a postcard. However, don't go overboard. See below.

Keep notes. By the end of a long day, all the reviews can start to blend together. Make a separate page for each reviewer and mark down which images they pointed out liking, where they paused a bit longer, what questions they had about your work and specific feedback they gave you. You may also want to record audio of each meeting, if the reviewer is cool with that.

DON'T

Don't default to an iPad presentation. After having looked at about 20 people's work this weekend, I’ve seen that the iPad is not necessarily the best way to show still photography.  The glare in some rooms makes it very hard to see the photos, especially if your images tend to be dark. I often found myself looking at my own reflection instead of the photos.

Also, unless the iPad presentation is really slick, it can feel like not enough care was put into the portfolio. I mean, let's admit it, how hard is it to create a folder of images for someone to flip through? When I see a beautifully printed portfolio, it lends the photographer some legitimacy, makes them at least appear to have invested a lot of time and effort into their work, all which helps me take them more seriously.

Everyone spends so much time on their phones now, consuming an almost endless stream of imagery. It doesn’t feel as unique to be swipe through an iPad. Print feels special.

All that said, pay attention to your budget and don’t spend the extra money on printing if you can’t afford it.

Don't force your leave behind on the reviewer. Some people flew in for the event and may not want to tote a bunch of promos and books back. Or they may feel it's environmentally wasteful and rather not have the extra 'stuff' in their lives. Or they just may not have liked your work enough to want to take a promo. Ask if they'd like a card, but don't push it. Also don't just offer a huge and bulky leave behind. If you want to make something big, it's also nice to offer something small like a postcard.

Don't make excuses. Popular examples include: "I didn't bring my strongest work." "I didn't have time to put together much, but this should give you an idea." or "I just found out about this event."

Don't argue with constructive criticism The people looking at your work know what they are talking about. They may all have different opinions, but that is valid considering that people come from different backgrounds and that visual art is very subjective. You may not agree with someone, and that is ok, but don't tell them that they are wrong.

Photographers, what about the typical speed-dating format would you change? Do you get enough out of the reviews to justify the expense (if it was a paid review?)

Reviewers, what are your pet peeves? Can you share any review success stories where you ended up working with someone after a review?

Want to get ready for a portfolio review? Contact me to learn how we can fine tune your portfolio, create a great promo and get the most out of the time and money you're investing.

New Orleans Photo Alliance's PhotoNOLA portfolio review session at the International House Hotel conference facility

New Orleans Photo Alliance's PhotoNOLA portfolio review session at the International House Hotel conference facility

Stephanie Rausser Website

I’m excited to share a recent website update for lifestyle photographer and director Stephanie Rausser. Stephanie’s motion and still work has a focus on couples, children and families. She brings a bright and inviting quality to all of her work.

You can see more of Stephanie’s work at www.stephanierausser.com